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  • We've added wheel and brake kits from Béringer Aero

    Air Plains Services, a world leader in General Aviation engine and avionics upgrades, announced today it has been named a Preferred Installer for Béringer Aero, a top global supplier of wheels and brakes for a variety of aircraft, including the Cessna 180 and 182. “We’re excited to offer Béringer wheel and brake kits, particularly to our Cessna 180 and 182 customers, whether they’re planning an engine upgrade with any of our STCs or just wanting a better landing gear system,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “We’re continuing to expand our product line in response to our customers wanting a one-stop shop for the high-quality components they want when planning an upgrade in order to minimize downtime. “The Béringer STCs are approved by both the FAA and EASA, and we’ll install them here or ship almost anywhere in the world along with our complete engine kits and other components a customer might order from us,” Church said. Based in France, Béringer began producing wheels and brakes for automotive applications in 1985 and has been counted on by auto and motorcycle racing teams through the years. In 2002, company founder Gilbert Béringer, also a pilot and aircraft builder, decided to apply his patented high-performance braking solutions to the aeronautical world. The company has an office that includes support services in the U.S. in Greenville, S.C. For more information about Béringer wheel and brake systems or any other Air Plains products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Air Plains Open House May 30th - Meet our new Garmin® rep

    We're excited to join the Garmin® family as a new Authorized Dealer, and we're celebrating with an Open House on Thursday, May 30th, at our facility at Wellington (Kansas) Municipal Airport (KEGT), featuring our new Garmin representative to get you up to speed on all the latest in General Aviation avionics. Most of you know we've been adding new products in recent years, complementing our industry-leading range of high-performance engine upgrades and helping us become the one-stop shop for all your aircraft needs. We've been serving General Aviation customers around the world for 47 years, and joining the Garmin family is our latest response to your requests for additional avionics options. As an added incentive to update your cockpit with advanced Garmin products, we're offering a brand-new, custom-made panel to the first five customers at no charge*. All our panels are designed and fabricated in-house, powder-coated, and laser-etched to your specifications. There are only a limited number of spots available, so RSVP early. "With the addition of Garmin products to our lineup, we can round out your airplane upgrade project regardless of requirement or budget," said Katie Church, Air Plains president. "Combining an avionics upgrade with an engine upgrade means you take advantage of lower overall labor costs and reduced downtime." Our Open House kicks off at 10 am and we'll feed you while you're here. Join us for this special event, learn about the latest Garmin products and chat with us about all our engine upgrades, avionics packages, PMA spare parts and more. Ample airplane parking next to our facility is available. See you then. * Call for details For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Troubleshooting of piston powered propellers with blade seal leakage

    Following installation of a new three blade McCauley propeller it is common to see some leakage from the blade seal. Models affected include All C200, C300, C400, and C500 oil filled propellers. This includes the McCauley 'Blackmac' 401 propeller that Air Plains Services sells and holds a number of STCs for. Service information is to be added to appropriate McCauley Service Manual until next manual revision is issued. Service manuals affected include 701115, 761001, 780630, 810915. Please use link below to download the complete three page document. Please note this article serves as a basic summary and does not in any way replace the complete approved document. In summary McCauley states the following when checking/correcting leaking propeller: Clean the blade of all traces of oil and dirt using a cloth dampened with mineral spirits. Run engine and cylce propeller at least five times. Inspect blade for continued oil leakage and clean if necessary per step 1. Repeate step 2. Inspect blade. Leaking should be tapering off or completely stopped. If leaking has stopped no further action is needed. If leaking has decreased, continue operation for up to 20 hours. If leaking continues after 20 hours, propeller must be removed from aircraft and sent to an approved propeller shop for repair. Click below to download the complete document: For more product information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Air Plains Services Named Authorized Garmin Dealer

    WELLINGTON, KS (April 2, 2024) – Air Plains Services, a world leader in general aviation engine and avionics upgrades, has been named an authorized dealer for Garmin® International avionics components and systems. “We’re thrilled to be able to offer our customers access to Garmin products as an authorized dealer,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “Whatever the project – a total engine and avionics upgrade or simply a panel upgrade – we can now supply a cost-effective solution as part of our one-stop-shop capability. “More and more often, our customers are coming to us with requirements that reach beyond an engine upgrade, whether they are private owners or fleet operators,” Church added. “They see this as an opportunity to completely transform an older Cessna into an aircraft that continues to meet 21st century flight operations. As a Garmin dealer, we can better meet their requirements at a greater overall value.” Garmin is one of the best-known suppliers of general aviation avionics and offers a full range of products, including navigation and communication components, sensors, transponders, weather and traffic systems, and engine monitors. In addition to its widening range of avionics, Air Plains offers the added benefit of custom powder-coated and laser-engraved avionics panels designed and produced in-house on CNC machines specifically to the customer’s preferred layout. “When a customer chooses to upgrade the avionics and engine at the same time, we’re able to offer a package price that takes into account the synergy of labor hours required for both,” Church said. “That can translate to a significant cost savings.” Air Plains plans to host an event in Wellington, Kansas, this summer with Garmin technical experts on hand to answer customer questions. More information will be shared in the coming weeks. For more information about Garmin avionics or any of Air Plains other products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Air Plains Cessna 182P, 182Q Customers with 300hp Upgrade Eligible for Trolltune Fresh Pick Gross Weight Increase STC

    WELLINGTON, KS (April 2, 2024) – Air Plains Services, a world leader in general aviation engine and avionics upgrades, confirmed today its customers, or prospective customers, with a Cessna 182 P or Q model with the 300hp engine upgrade are eligible for the Trolltune Fresh Pick gross weight increase STC. The GWI STC adds 150-160 pounds of useful load with no modification to the aircraft and can be added both with new orders and for existing customers. The STC can be purchased through Air Plains and is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and Transport Canada. The STC covers some 3,600 airframes produced by Cessna in the U.S. as well as Cessna 182s produced under license in Reims, France. “Air Plains Services been installing the Fresh Pick STC for many customers over the last 14-plus years,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “The added take-off weight helps tremendously since the engine we are installing, the IO-550, is heavier than the original O-470. Many customers have found it very useful and, at only $750 plus filing paperwork, a ‘no brainer’ upgrade to add at the time of the Air Plains 300HP engine installation.” The STC was developed by California engineer Tom Storli in response to a requirement for extra loiter time for a small fleet of special mission 182Qs. Following an extensive development and flight test program, the STC was approved by the FAA in 2008. STC details and an extensive FAQ are available at the Trolltune website:  https://stc182.com/. “Most of our customers use the extra payload for fuel, which can more than 260 nautical miles and more than 2 hours of flight time,” said Jennifer Storli Getz, Trolltune vice president. “We also see it used by sky diving companies to add extra jumpers. The sky is the limit for what you can do with the added capability.” For more information about the Trolltune Fresh Pick gross weight increase STC for Cessna 182P and 182Q models, or any of Air Plains other products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Air Plains Services Introduces Second PMA Airbox for Stock Cessna 172s

    WELLINGTON, KS (March 5, 2024) – Air Plains Services, a world leader in general aviation engine and avionics upgrades, has followed its recent announcement and gained a second PMA for new-build Cessna 172 airboxes, this time for a short airbox designed to fit Cessna 172N and 172P models with the original O-320 Lycoming engine. In December, the company announced approval of a new PMA long airbox for Cessna 172 I, K, L, and M models with the factory original O-320 engine. Air Plains has produced improved PMA airboxes for its popular 172XP engine upgrades for more than a decade and added new airboxes for Cessna 180, 182 and 188 models in 2020. Compared with OEM airboxes, the Air Plains PMA airboxes feature a number of improvements developed over years of airbox repair and include structural adhesive reinforcements in areas of high stress, a hardened control arm with a thicker cross-section, added nut plates to the front of the airbox to accommodate a Brackett air filter, if installed, all at a much lower price. “Our airbox business has blossomed in recent years,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “The success of our original 172 airbox designed for the upgraded 180hp Lycoming engine prompted owners of other models to ask about an option for their aircraft and we responded. “The key for us is that we do the design and production on-site, so we monitor every step of the process,” Church said. “Our years of experience results in a high quality airbox at a price considerably lower than the OEM option.” The Air Plains part number is APS0552164-4 and is approved for Lycoming O-320-H2AD and O-320-D2J engines on the Cessna 172N and 172P airframes. Improvements include: Use of a structural adhesive reinforcement in the highest stress areas, distributing stress between the skins and preventing common cracking and collar separation issues; A collar flange made of a stronger, heat-treated alloy: ​ Corrosion-resistant steel shaft and oil-impregnated bronze bushing which eliminates the risk of needle ingestion by the engine; A more robustly welded heat duct assembly that is riveted and bonded to the side skin; Four-corner fuel drain holes instead of the standard two allow fuel drainage from any attitude on the ground, preventing airbox fires when over-primed; The air filter is held on with screws, eliminating the troublesome quarter-turn fasteners; Integrated nut plates can mount a Backett™ BA5110 filter using its hardware or can mount any other filter with the screws included with the airbox;​ The airbox features Air Plains’ improved carburetor heat arm manufactured from hardened steel and a larger bearing area for the clamp, reducing the wear from the cable clamp.  ​ Smart design and manufacturing produce a better airbox without adding to aircraft weight. The company also produces PMA airbox accessories such as collars, gaskets and adjustable attachment brackets. Air Plains manufactures and inspects all its parts, including all its airboxes, onsite at the company’s machine shop. For more information about the new PMA bracket (including model eligibility) or any of Air Plains other products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Training is critical – in firefighting and flying

    John Dean approaches flying the same way he did as a captain in the Phoenix fire department, and head of the nationally recognized urban search and rescue dog team. “We’ve got to train enough and be professional enough in how we go about this so we don’t have a bad day. If I make a mistake because of ignorance or I don’t take the time to learn, someone else could pay for it,” Dean said. He likened the two – firefighting and aviation – as parallel universes. They are both demanding, exacting, and exhilarating, when done well. Each has a galaxy of specialties within the universe that allows a motivated person ample opportunity to keep learning. Suffice to say, he goes all in for whatever he takes on. His demand for quality and precision comes from, not only from 45 years with the Phoenix Fire Department but having the great fortune of mentors in both the fire service and aviation. The first was his father, an A&P mechanic at an FBO in Phoenix, and then on to several of the early airlines at PHX. He said he was “old school” -- do it right and take pride in your work. Dean said his earliest memories are of sweeping hangars and polishing airplanes when his dad took him on weekend jobs to refurbish World War II airplanes, usually for agriculture or forestry missions. It was here the seeds of flying were planted. “I grew up watching Twelve O’Clock High on television and then I’d go and sit alone in the cockpit of a B-17 or a B-24 and it was like a big playground to me,” he said. “I should have used the money I made on my paper route to buy one of those old airplanes but I didn’t have that much foresight.” Growing up around airplanes introduced him to some local “old timers” who flew Bell 47 helicopters, one of whom also flew Spitfires in World War II. “He was pretty stoic about his war experience,” Dean said. “But now I’d give anything to be able to sit down with Mr. McCarthey for 30 minutes over a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. The things he experienced would be unbelievable.” After high school, his father got him a job as an aircraft fueler at Sky Harbor airport when the airport still hosted a large general aviation contingent. It turned out to be a life-changing position. He said a lot of the people working the ramp were returning from service in Viet Nam and many were looking at taking the fire service exam. They talked him into joining them even though he had hopes of college and maybe a flying career. “Well, Emergency was big on TV back then and I thought I’d go take it just to see what it was like even though my focus was elsewhere at the time,” he said. It piqued his interest enough to start fire science classes, taught by fire fighters, at the local community college. When they asked him about applying for the fire fighting academy, he decided to jump in and officially joined the Phoenix Fire Department at age 19. As luck would have it, the fire chief in Phoenix at the time was Alan Brunacini, who’s been referred to as America’s fire chief. He revolutionized fire service command structure, a structure adopted now around the world and authored a number of books recognized as must-reads for fire fighters. He introduced at number initiatives and services within the Phoenix department to enhance the lives of the firefighters and raise the level of professionalism. He was also a disciple of a softer approach to dealing with the public than was current at the time. Bruno, the name everyone called him, used the term customer and even developed a personality for this customer, calling her Mrs. Smith. He said the key was to do what you could to help Mrs. Smith, who may be having her darkest day. “He said if it’s not illegal or immoral and it benefits Mrs. Smith, do it,” Dean said. “That gives you a lot of freedom to do what you can to help.” Bruno also advocated for being a life-long learner, always honing your skills to provide exemplary customer service at all times. Dean took all this to heart, first joining the technical rescue team, then gaining his Para-Medic certification and on to training and handling urban search and rescue dogs, all while performing traditional roles in the fire department as head of an engine company. “It’s like aviation. Once you get your license, there are so many other avenues you can go down and different ratings to pursue,” he said. With a love of aviation still deeply held, he was happy to find a connection to his firefighter role, mostly while aloft in helicopters used for rescue. “You’re long-lining, hanging from long ropes under helicopters (they use hoists these days) and it was kind of neat to be a part of aviation,” Dean said. “We had to know about weight-and-balance, how heat affects operations, things like that, and kept me a part of aviation.” But piloting, for the time being, remained a dream on hold as life and family and a demanding career took precedence. A few years before retirement, however, a chance visit to a small airport near Phoenix rekindled his dream. “It was like, I’m just sitting in these starting blocks until the time is right and you just take off,” Dean said. “Instead of being sad and being at the end of your career, no, it’s doing something I’ve wanted to do since I was nineteen.” He was asked by the owner of another dog training academy to trailer a derelict airframe from a small airport nearby out to California for use as a training prop. Arriving to pick it up, he visited with Andy Estes, the owner, and got a tour of an old Waco he was refurbishing. Dean, relying on the lessons Bruno taught, was blown away by the care and quality of the project. “There was a sign there that read Ask me about flight lessons,” Dean said. “After seeing his craftsmanship, I thought his flying can’t be any different than the quality of his airplane, so that’s where I started my lessons.” So, a few years before retirement, with a family raised and savings in the bank, he learned to fly. He said he wanted to be ‘completely confident’ in his ability with his wife, Becki, on board so, following his training under Chief Bruno, he did a lot of the flight training twice. His drive for high quality, professional customer service again surfaced. “Now that I am retired and a professional customer, and much older, I don't see the craftsmanship nor value in customer service seen years ago,” Dean said. “I also factor in that my family and friends fly with me, and along with the innocent people on the ground, this flying stuff becomes very important and isn't just heading out on a Saturday morning for breakfast and a lot of fun.” Estes became a friend and mentor and when Dean said he wanted his own aircraft, Estes suggested an early model B, C or D Cessna 172, telling him there was a payload advantage. Dean focused on the B model for a number of reasons, and because he already had an Air Plains 180hp engine upgrade in mind, the B was the earliest model eligible. “Finding an airplane is a full-time job,” Dean said. “It starts out as fun but at some point, all the notes and records just overwhelm you.” After four months of looking, his son, Jason, found a 1961 B model for sale in North Dakota that boasted a new paint job in 2006 and he convinced his father to call about it, assuring him it was not one he had already called on. Turned out to be another lucky move. The story goes, Dean said, the original owner had been meticulous in caring for the aircraft through the years, keeping it in a hangar and carrying out regular maintenance. His family had taken over care of the airplane before selling it to the current owner. The current owner had owned the airplane just long enough to get his license and had already bought a Bonanza, so he was keen to sell it. And lots of people were keen to buy it. So Dean, his current CFI, and a trusted mechanic decided to check it out and flew up to North Dakota to inspect it. After a short time going over the airplane, his mechanic told him to buy it. Today. He did, and the next day, he and his CFI flew it from North Dakota back to Phoenix. They did an annual inspection when they brought the aircraft home and Dean took the opportunity to really start to immerse himself in the aircraft, working alongside his trusted friend and mechanic. “Now you really start learning things, cleaning things and making it your own,” Dean said. “Plus, it’s nice to start off with new replaceables, new brakes, new tires, new rotors.” Ten months later, he said he backtracked much of the route on his way over to Wellington, Kansas, for the Air Plains upgrade. “I purchased my plane after researching Air Plains and my plan from day one was to get it to them for their upgrade,” Dean said. “I looked into rebuilding the original O-300 engine and by the time I paid for the rebuild and changed out things like the alternator and prop I felt the best decision was to go with their firewall-forward, everything-new upgrade and have a much more reliable plane.” Not only did the numbers work for him, but he also said he was impressed with the customer service he got from the first phone call forward. “When I showed up at Air Plains, I saw and felt a level of respect and comfort I had not experienced since I was 10 years old going to work with my Dad on weekends,” Dean said, “The shop was clean, mechanic's tools were spaced near each plane and it was obvious those tools were used by folks that took pride in their work.” He said his research pointed to a company built by founders Mike and Carolyn Kelley as a company with a solid reputation for honest, high-quality work. After working with Katie Church and Rafael Soldan, long-time employees who now run the company, he said he was glad he had chosen Air Plains for his upgrade. “I’m pretty demanding; I wouldn’t work for me, but they pulled it off without any problems,” he said. “I have nothing but absolute trust and respect for what they’ve got going on there.” He now has more than 100 hours of issue-free flying on the new engine, which he said still looks like new. “I have more power than I need, yet it’s not so much power that a newer pilot is overwhelmed,” Dean said. “It’s so nice on an Arizona summer morning with high temps and humidity that I can take my wife up and enjoy our flight. I am also able to look out the windscreen for traffic and not have to watch the temp gauge border just left of the red line, no matter how I set the mixture or lower the nose.” Dean said he prefers the original avionics instrument panel and has no desire for a glass panel. He did install two new uAvionix AV-30 units, one configured as a digital attitude indicator, the other as a gyro directional unit to replace the old attitude indicator. The previous owner had also installed a new Appareo/Stratus ADS-B In/Out transponder, and he also has a Sentry ADS-B IN backup that links to his iPad to always keep track of traffic in the busy airspace around Phoenix. He’s contracted with Six Pack Aero to fabricate a new powder-coated panel, adding USB ports and a uAvionix AOA indicator in place of the analog clock, as he said it would be useful when his son and, eventually, his granddaughter learn to fly. Keeping with family tradition, son Jason is a firefighter in nearby Tempe. He is keen to learn to fly but has little time now, with two small kids, to devote to lessons, much like his father when he was a first responder. “People say you don’t need the AOA but anything that gives us another tap on the shoulder is worth it, to me,” Dean said, staying true to his mantra of safety first. Dean said finding hangar space for his airplane near his home in Chandler would normally have been as hard as finding the right airplane to buy but, once again, good fortune was on his side. He had already decided to build his own but that was going to take some time. “Back then, at least Chandler had tie-downs but we have monsoon summer storms and they really whip up, but there were no hangars to be had,” Dean said. While hanging out at a friend’s hangar one day, another friend drove up and told him a guy had just put a For Rent sign on his hangar there at Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), a short drive southeast of downtown Phoenix. “We got in his truck and went over there,” Dean said. “The guy was just hanging a second sign and told us he had twelve people coming over to look at it. “I said we’ll take, if you don’t mind.” The hangar owner had bought a Cirrus to put in the hangar, but the aircraft was back ordered for two years. The timing, for Dean, was perfect. “He’s got a customer he appreciates, and I take as good a care of his hangar as I did the apparatus bay when I drove a fire truck,” he said. “He’s still waiting on his airplane and I have a hanger to rent while I build mine, so as we have all these big storms and the summer sun hitting on my red paint on your cowling, I don’t have to deal with it.” Meanwhile, Dean and a friend leased land at Casa Grande Municipal Airport (KCGZ) and started construction on three hangars – one each for their own airplanes and one to rent. “It’s amazing how this has all come together,” he said. “It’s been one dream come true after another.” Dean said his wife, Becki, has embraced the role of “professional passenger,” and he said her enthusiasm for flying is the envy of the other pilots, who tell him their wives don’t really enjoy it. Though retired from the fire department, Dean still runs the regional urban search and rescue dog team and spends weekends involved in hangar construction. Right now, he’s flying around 125 hours a year (he has more than 500 total) and plans to fly a lot more when the hangars are complete. “Right now, trips with Becki are usually short out and back trips but at the top of the bucket list is a longer trip flying through Monument Valley,” Dean said. “As soon as the hangars are done and we get our occupancy permit, we’re going.”

  • REVISED: Our Runway is Being Refurbished

    KEGT, our home runway, is getting a makeover. The City of Wellington has announced a three-phase runway upgrade starting this spring and lasting through July 5 (as of the current timetable, subject to delays such as weather). The first two phases, May 6 through June 4, will not significantly impact flight operations into KEGT, only taxiway and parking infrastructure. The apron and parking spaces adjacent to Air Plains will remain open, although taxiing to the facility will change according to the current upgrade phase. Phase 3 will focus on the runway, disrupting flight operations between June 5 and July 5. Phase 1 and 2 Phase 1 (scheduled for May 6-20) will address infrastructure issues on the south taxiway, which will be closed. Our facility will be accessible from the center and north apron connections and the north end of the taxiway. Phase 2 (scheduled for May 21-June4) will do the same on the north taxiway, which will be closed with barriers erected. Our facility and parking spaces will be accessible through the center and south runway connectors and taxiway. We ask you to contact the airport manager a few days prior to your scheduled arrival for specific instructions on taxi and parking. The airport manager can be reached at (620) 440-2213. Let him know you are scheduled for service at Air Plains. Phase 3 Phase 3, scheduled for June 5 through July 5, will focus on the main runway. The airport manager will make every effort to help our customers get into and out of the airport during this time. Again, we ask you to contact the airport manager a few days prior to your scheduled arrival or departure to discuss your requirements. The City of Wellington Airport Manager can be reached at (620) 440-2213. Let him know you are scheduled for service at Air Plains. We apologize for any inconvenience this will cause but we’re also grateful to the City of Wellington for its ongoing runway maintenance. Aerospace manufacturing and general aviation operations at KEGT are major contributors to the economy here in Sumner County, so improving your airport experience is a bright spot for us. Thank you so much for your understanding and flexibility. If you need any additional information from us, please give us a call. For more information about any of Air Plains products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Air Plains Services Announces Transport Canada Approval for its Unique Cessna 172R Model 180hp Upgrade STC

    WELLINGTON, KS (Feb. 1, 2024) – Air Plains Services, a world leader in General Aviation engine and avionics upgrades, announced today it has gained approval from Transport Canada for its FAA-approved Supplemental Type Certificate that upgrades Cessna 172R model aircraft to 180hp without a complete engine change. The Air Plains STC kit for R model Skyhawks includes a new propeller that allows the standard derated Lycoming IO-360-L2A to operate at 2,700 rpm instead of the normal 2,400 rpm, thus generating 180hp. In addition to increased performance for the airplane, the upgrade offers a 100-pound increase in payload. “Confirming approval for this STC from Transport Canada is the type of service we’re happy to perform to give our customers the confidence they want in buying from Air Plains,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. According to Transport Canada, a number of international STCs such as this one can be approved for use in Canada based solely on the home nation’s certification. With FAA approval already in hand for the Air Plains STC, it qualified for Canadian approval without a separate approval process. “Our unique STC kit, shipped almost anywhere in the world, is a great option for 172R model owners to get more performance from their airplane with just a new propeller and a small upgrade kit,” Church said. “The payload increase makes it a true four-place aircraft which can be a game-changer in a training environment or allows it simply to carry more luggage on a family vacation.” For more information about any of Air Plains products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • Cessna 172 PMA Airbox

    Cessna 172 Airbox, FAA PMA Approved Replacement Part Number: 0552113-11 Model Eligibility: Cessna 172I, 172K equipped with the Lycoming O-320-E2D engine. Cessna 172 Airbox Description: As the leader in firewall forward STC products for Cessna™ single aircraft Air Plains is all too familiar with customers "airbox woes".  Until now customers had to choose between temporary repairing their airbox or purchasing a new airbox from Cessna™.  The problem is that both options can be very expensive, and the final product is still an airbox susceptible to several common issues.​ Air Plains now offers customers a third option; our FAA-PMA approved APS0552113-11/APS0552113-13 airbox provides MORE DURABILIY and MORE VALUE over previous options for 172 owners.  Furthermore, for fleet operators, our airboxes are more universal.  Both the APS0552113-11 and APS0552113-13 airboxes are identical and approved on all 172I, K, L, M, F172L, and F172M applications, this means you don’t need to keep two on hand.​ When we developed our PMA airbox we looked at the common issues with the factory airbox and identified several areas for improvement:​ Our airbox features structural adhesive reinforcement in the highest stress areas, this distributes the stress between the skins and prevents the common cracking and collar separation issues seen all too often.​ The collar flange on the body is made of a stronger alloy which has been heat treated.  This strengths the collar joint significantly when combined with the adhesive reinforcement. ​ The shaft is made from corrosion resistant steel and the troublesome needle bearing is replaced by a more robust oil-impregnated bronze bushing which eliminates the risk of needle ingestion by the engine.  ​ The steel bracket has been revised to prevent cracking of the co-pilot side skin below it.  ​ The crimped heat duct, known to loosen, has been replaced by a more robust welded assembly which is riveted and bonded to the side skin.​ The original two fuel drain holes have been replaced with four corner drains.  This allows fuel drainage from any attitude on the ground, preventing airbox fires when over-primed.​ Your air filter is held on with screws so there is no need for the troublesome quarter turn fasteners.  Our airbox has integrated nutplates to mount a Backett™ BA5110 filter using its hardware and can mount any other filter with the screws included with the airbox.​ This airbox also features Air Plains improved carburetor heat arm which is manufactured from hardened steel and has a larger bearing area for the clamp; this significantly reduces the wear from the cable clamp.  ​ Our PMA airboxes are designed with weight in mind because we understand that a heavy airbox is a highly stressed airbox.  Rather than using heavy materials such as stainless steel to replace lightweight aluminum components we have made intelligent design decisions such as better distributing loads and reinforcing riveted joints with the addition of adhesive.  This improves the strength of the airbox without adding weight.  The added benefit is that your aircraft does not get heavier!  ​ The result of these improvements is an airbox superior to the factory original which will provide many more years of trouble-free service. Hardware Included: 1X – 649974 – Airbox Carburetor Gasket​ 4X – 1728902-19 - Air Filter Screws For Non-Brackett™ Filters​ 1X - APS0750111-19-1 – Carburetor Heat Cable Clamp Bolt​ 2X – AN916-10L – Carburetor Heat Cable Clamp Washers​ 1X – MS21083N3 – Carburetor Heat Cable Clamp Locknut Installation Instructions and Tips: Download Airbox ICA here Recommended Purchases with this product: 649974 Gasket DP0552130-11 Carurtor Heat Box Induction Seal BA5510 Brackett Air Filter For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Air Plains Services Introduces New PMA Long Airbox for Stock Cessna 172s

    WELLINGTON, KS (Dec 4, 2023) – Air Plains Services, a world leader in General Aviation engine and avionics upgrades, announced today it has gained FAA approval for a new-manufacture Cessna 172 long airbox designed for a variety of stock OEM engines, adding to the range of PMA airboxes it produces for the 180hp 172XP engine upgrade and for various Cessna 180, 182 and 188 aircraft models. “We’ve been including a new airbox with our 172-180HP engine upgrade package for about 10 years, so it seemed a natural move to develop a similar, improved design for a wider range of 172s that don’t have our upgrade,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “Like the other PMA airboxes we produce, we’ve used our years of experience repairing damaged factory airboxes to identify common issues and develope a number of improvements for a stronger unit, at a significantly lower price than the OEM unit.” Improvements for the new 172 PMA long airboxes produced by Air Plains are similar to those developed for the company’s other PMA airboxes and include the addition of structural adhesive reinforcements in areas of high stress, a hardened control arms with a thicker cross-section, and added nut plates to the front of the airbox to accommodate a Brackett air filter, if installed. One of many improvements also includes an additional two fuel drain holes. This allows fuel drainage from any attitude on the ground, preventing airbox fires when over-primed. The airbox also features structural adhesive reinforcement in the highest stress areas, this distributes the stress between the skins and prevents the common cracking and collar separation issues seen all too often. The PMA airboxes were also designed with weight in mind beccause we understand that a heavy airbox is a highly stressed airbox. Rather than using heavy materials such as stainless steel to replace lightweight aluminum components we have made intelligent design decisions such as better distributing loads and reinforcing rivited joints with the addition of adhesive. The result of these improvements is an airbox superior to the factory original which will provide many more years of trouble-free service. The new Air Plains airboxes are PMA replacements for part numbers 0552113-11, 0552113-13 and 0552164-4 on stock engines for Cessna 172I, K, L, M, N and P models and for Reims, France produced 172I, M, N and P models. Air Plains has produced PMA airboxes for its 180hp engine upgrade kit (STC SA4428SW) for 10 years. In early 2020, Air Plains gained PMA to produce replacement airboxes for Cessna 180, 182 and 188 models (part numbers 0750144-1 and 0750144-33). The company also produces PMA airbox replacement accessories such as collars, gaskets and adjustable attachment brackets. Air Plains manufactures and inspects all its parts, including all its airboxes, onsite at the company’s machine shop prior to placing into inventory. For more information about the new PMA airbox (including model eligibility) or any of Air Plains other products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, or visit www.airplains.com. For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com.

  • D-6594 Spinner Assembly

    Air Plains Services offers a number of McCauley propeller STCs. The STC paperwork can be purchased alone or with the complete propeller assembly. The McCauley P-4014808 propeller is approved for many airframes including the Cessna 180, 182, 188, 210 and 206! Air Plains Services STC Paperwork approves the propeller installation with the airframe and engine configuration. The propeller can be delivered complete with the appropriate spinner assembly right to your maintenance shop of choice. The spinner assembly comes complete with the washers, shims, backplate and polished dome. Contact a member of our sales team today by email: sales@airplains.com for current price and lead time. For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Air Plains offers flight schools competitive advantages through legacy Cessna 172 fleets

    The demand for flight training has increased in the last few years as airlines struggle to find qualified pilots. Flight schools are busy providing training to the new generation of pilots and finding a competitive advantage is quintessential to sustain growth. Flight Schools are required to modernize to attract young pilots and are faced with the predicament of purchasing new OEM aircraft and equipment and further delaying the return on investment. In the last 45+ years, Air Plains Services has enabled several flight schools to become more profitable with the legacy Cessna 172 aircraft. Fleet operators are pleased with the substantial decrease in operation costs, enhanced safety and dedicated support they receive, consequently, they are able to make better decisions to invest profits. All business owners are aware that operation costs must be controlled. Utilizing a modernized legacy fleet of aircraft provides much better ROI when compared to new OEM aircraft because the initial investment is substantially less. On average the payoff is achieved in half the time. The cost of replacement of OEM parts is very high and the lack of availability could ground an aircraft for a few days. Our STCkits are produced with certified parts that we manufacture in our own facility with controlled costs and a fraction of OEM prices. We stock over 1200 of our kit parts to enable our customers to get back into the air safer and reduce downturn. Fleet standardization enhances safety with added simplicity and cross-training between different aircraft. We strive to make our flight manuals standard and we provide operators with additional data when necessary. The added horsepower and lighter airframe weight provide a better margin of safety to reach pattern altitude quicker and perform well on hot, sunny days. Utilizing the most famous trainer aircraft, the Cessna 172 with added power and superb handling characteristics, enables students to learn the basics of stick-and-rudder flying. Air Plains is also equipped with the ability to provide a modern cockpit environment with glass instruments, metalized panels, and a new interior that is customized and branded. The best advantage Air Plains can provide is a partnership and dedicated support. We take care of the fleet support while the customer can concentrate on running the business operations. Customers prefer one place to call to get parts on the shelf and use our expertise to find solutions fast. Our excellent relationship with Lycoming Engines and Continental Motors enables us to take care of maintenance items and provide a fleet discount. We strive to provide continual engineering and improvement to our kit parts and our goal is to provide the quickest turnaround possible even when custom parts need to be fabricated for customers. A prudent manager must consider all available options to sustain growth and stay competitive. Investing in legacy aircraft that are safe, modernized, and maintained by an industry expert to meet customer demand is an excellent strategy for a healthy operation and provides much steeper growth when compared to the initial investment necessary to purchase new OEM aircraft. Air Plains is well-positioned to support flight schools to pursue this strategy and we offer several packages that are customized to work with flight schools of different sizes.

  • FrankenHawk

    Our friend Kent Orr, just north of us in Nebraska, was recently profiled in Cessna Flyer. Read about his salvage business and his "weekend" project, Frankenhawk.

  • Battery Tray Kit, Cessna 172

    Cessna 172 Battery Tray Kit for manifold style battery with Air Plains 180HP engine upgrade, STC SA4428SW. The original battery box may be replaced with a manifold battery as approved under type certificate or PMA for serial numbers 17272885 thru 17274009. This installation is recommended for new and previous installed 180HP engine upgrades. Air Plains new battery tray design is lighter than the original Cessna design and has less corrosion potential. The simplicity of the tray makes it easy to access the battery for maintenance or charging. Also there is more clearance to access the LH magneto. Complete kit includes new tray, bolts, new venting tube, and installation instructions. Manifold style battery is required and sold separately. Part Number: 1728509-KIT Applicable serial number range: 17269310 thru 17272884, 24V. For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Airbox Arm, FAA PMA Approved

    Air Plains Services is pleased to announce the FAA PMA Approval for replacement airbox arm. This new arm is one piece billet machined and comes complete with the hardware shown in the photo. This is a replacement for part number: 0750111-19 Model Eligibility: 172Q, 175, 175A, 177, 177A, 177B, 180 S/N: 30000-53203 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 182E, 182F, 182G, 182H, 182J, 182K, 182L, 182M, 182N, 182P, 182Q, 182R, F182P, F182Q, A182 S/N: 0001-0136, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E S/N: 658-1149, A185E S/N: 1150-1300, 188, 188A, 188B Assembly Includes: APS0750111-19, Arm APS0750111-19-1, Clamp MS16562-16, Pin AN960-10L, Washers, two MS21083N3, Nut ICA available for download below For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

  • Engine Break-In, After your Engine Installation

    We are often asked what is the recommended engine break-in procedure following the installation of a new engine. Whether it is a Lycoming O-360 or Continental IO-550 the first 25-50 hours are very important. During break-in procedure maintain 65% to 75% power. It is important to keep your engine developing power during the first three hours of operation. Adjust CHT temperatures with a richer mixture and cowl flaps, if available. Keep CHT temperatures between 300F and 380F when possible. Avoid long periods at idle and adjust descent profiles to maintain higher power settings when possible. Follow information and detailed instructions highlighted in the referenced document available for download here. Run at high cruise power levels for best piston ring-cylinder wall mating. The use of low power settings does not expand the piston rings enough and will leave a film of oil on the cylinder walls. Continue break-in operations for 50 hours or until oil consumption stabilizes. For additional technical support please contact Air Plains via email at tech@airplains.com

  • Air Plains Introduces 3-Point Primer for its Lycoming 180hp Engine STC

    Air Plains Services, a world leader in general aviation engine and avionics upgrades, has developed a new three-point engine primer kit for its 180hp engine upgrade STC, providing enhanced cold engine starts compared with the standard single-point primer. “Our new three-cylinder primer is particularly effective in cold-weather locations, but it gives anyone a smoother, quicker start,” said Katie Church, Air Plains president. “If you have an Air Plains 172XP 180hp upgrade that was done prior to 2021, it’s very likely the original primer system was reinstalled with the new engine. While the previous process works just fine for most customers, we wanted to develop an option that was even more reliable for cold-weather customers.” Air Plains engineers worked directly with Lycoming to develop the new primer system to be compatible with the more than 2,700 existing 172XP 180hp upgrades, and to be an option for new customers. Air Plains also worked with Lycoming to develop the installation manual. The standard primer uses a single nozzle in the #3 cylinder for priming while the new kit adds nozzles for cylinders #2 and #4. The new three-point primer is one of the new products to be featured by Air Plains at the annual Sun ‘N Fun Aerospace Expo in Lakeland, Fla., March 28 through April 2. Air Plains will be in a larger exhibit space this year- MD-23 - and will show off several customer airplanes featuring various Air Plains upgrades. For more information about any of Air Plains products or services, call 1-800-752-8481 or +1-620-326-8904, visit www.airplains.com For online shopping, visit the Air Plains web store at https://shopairplains.com

  • Throttle Body Installation Aid

    Installation tips for Cessna 180 and 182 aircraft with Air Plains 300HP engine upgrade to assist in positioning the throttle body assembly correctly. Document number 1821601 is available for download and contains 11 step by step instructions with photos to assist. The required tools are included in our STC kit. If you have additional questions please contact our technical support at tech@airplains.com For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: tech@airplains.com

  • Engine Priming System

    3 Point Primer Kit optional for installation with Air Plains 180HP engine upgrade, STC SA4428SW. If your geographical location is primarily cold weather adding two priming nozzles will ease the starting procedure. Adding two priming nozzles has proven a smoother start. Air Plains collaborated with Lycoming to provide a custom primer line kit for Air Plains new and existing customers. If you have an Air Plains 172-180hp that was done prior to 2021 it is very likely the original primer system was reinstalled with the new engine. While the previous process works just fine, Air Plains has added an option to the upgrade kit to now offer a three point primer kit. If you have an existing Air Plains 172-180hp installation you very likely have the single priming system that is original to the aircraft. The standard installation reuses the existing primer lines and reinstalls on the new engine. Increase the chances of starting your engine during the first revolution with the three point primer system installed. Part Number: 172-180-3P Primer Installation manual available for download For more information, visit us at www.airplains.com Call: 800-752-8481 or (outside the U.S.) +1-620-326-8904 Email: sales@airplains.com

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